Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10790/2631

Survey of roadside alien plants in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park and adjacent residential areas 2001-2005.

File SizeFormat 
TR032_Prattetal_RoadsideWeedSurveyHAVO.pdf3.44 MBAdobe PDFView/Open

Item Summary

Title: Survey of roadside alien plants in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park and adjacent residential areas 2001-2005.
Authors: Pratt, Linda
Bio, Keali`i
Jacobi, James
Keywords: invasive species
management
Issue Date: 25 Jan 2016
Series/Report no.: TR-032
Abstract: The sides of all paved roads of Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park (HAVO) were surveyed on foot in 2001 to 2005, and the roadside presence of 240 target invasive and potentially invasive alien plant species was recorded in mile-long increments. Buffer zones 5–10 miles (8–16 km) long along Highway 11 on either side of the Kīlauea and Kahuku Units of the park, as well as Wright Road that passed by the disjunct `Ōla`a Tract Unit, were included in the survey. Highway 11 is the primary road through the park and a major island thoroughfare. Three residential subdivisions adjacent to the park were similarly surveyed in 0.5–1 mile (0.8–1.6 km) intervals in 2003, and data were analyzed separately. Two roads to the east and northeast were also surveyed, but data from these disjunct areas were analyzed separately from park roads. In total, 174 of the target alien species were observed along HAVO roads and buffers, exclusive of residential areas, and the mean number of target aliens per mile surveyed was 20.6. Highway 11 and its buffer zones had the highest mean number of target alien plants per mile (26.7) of all park roads, and the Mauna Loa Strip Road had the lowest mean (11.7). Segments of Highway 11 adjacent to HAVO and Wright Road next to `Ōla`a Tract had mean numbers of target alien per mile (24–47) higher than those of any internal road. Alien plant frequencies were summarized for each road in HAVO. Fifteen new records of vascular plants for HAVO were observed and collected along park roads. An additional 28 alien plant species not known from HAVO were observed along the buffer segments of Highway 11 adjacent to the park. Within the adjacent residential subdivisions, 65 target alien plant species were sighted along roadsides. At least 15 potentially invasive species not currently found within HAVO were observed along residential roads, and several other species found there have been previously eliminated from the park or controlled to remnant populations. Data collected from this survey can be used by the park and other landowners to help detect and manage invasive plant species that threaten the natural resources of their lands, and survey findings will inform managers of threats from alien species established along corridors beyond park boundaries. Recommendations were made for refining the list of incipient invasive plant species to search for near the park and for the repetition of periodic roadside weed surveys in the park.
Pages/Duration: 71
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10790/2631
Appears in Collections:Hawaii Cooperative Studies Unit (HCSU)



Items in UH System Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.