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Documenting acoustic variability among windward Hawai'i 'Amakihi (Hemignathus virens virens) populations on Hawai'i Island

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Title:Documenting acoustic variability among windward Hawai'i 'Amakihi (Hemignathus virens virens) populations on Hawai'i Island
Authors:Pang-Ching, Joshua
Keywords:Ecology
Acoustics
LC Subject Headings:Birdsongs - Hawai'i Island
Acoustics
Date Issued:2014
Publisher:ProQuest LLC
Citation:Documenting acoustic variability among windward Hawai'i 'Amakihi (Hemignathus virens virens) populations on Hawai'i Island Pang-Ching, Joshua. University of Hawai'i at Hilo, ProQuest Dissertations Publishing
Abstract:Vocalizations play a fundamental role in many aspects of a bird's life, including territoriality, mate choice, individual recognition, and predator avoidance. This is the first study to investigate how vocalizations differ across populations of a Hawaiian honeycreeper. I recorded song from 329 adult male Hawaii 'Amakihi (Hemignathus virens virens) in five populations across an elevational gradient on the windward side of Hawaii Island during the 2011-2013 breeding season and used sound analysis software to examine how eight song components vary within and among populations. Our results demonstrated that song varies greatly among populations with greatest divergence and lowest song variability in the low elevation population, where 'Amakihi have recently recovered from a disease-induced bottleneck. I also tested predictions of the Acoustic Adaptation Hypothesis (AAH) by examining how song characteristics vary between open and closed understory vegetation. 'Amakihi in open understory sang at higher frequencies relative to neighboring 'Amakihi in dense understory, thus providing moderate support for the AAH. This study demonstrates that both isolation and habitat heterogeneity has led to localized structuring of song over relatively short geographic distances.
Description:Thesis (M.S.)--University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo
Pages/Duration:72
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10790/2648
ISBN:9781321474817
Rights:All UHH dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: Tropical Conservation Biology and Environmental Science
TCBES Theses


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