Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10790/2678

Natural resources management needs for coastal and littoral marine ecosystems of the U.S. affiliated pacific islands: American Samoa, Guam, Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands, Republic of the Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia and the Republic of Palau.

Item Summary

Title: Natural resources management needs for coastal and littoral marine ecosystems of the U.S. affiliated pacific islands: American Samoa, Guam, Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands, Republic of the Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia and the Republic of Palau.
Authors: Haws, Maria
Issue Date: Nov 2006
Series/Report no.: TR-HCSU;002
Related To: http://hilo.hawaii.edu/hcsu/publications.php
Abstract: This report presents a summary of the research and management needs for natural resources of the U.S. Affiliated Pacific Islands. These islands include three island groups which are affiliated politically with the U.S., Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas, Guam, American Samoa and three independent nations which are freely affiliated with the U.S, the Republic of Palau, Federated States of Micronesia and the Republic of the
Marshall Islands. This work is intended to orient the U.S. Geological Survey Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center’s (PIERC) biological research to support management of natural resources in coastal and littoral marine ecosystems (CLME) in Hawaii and the U.S. Affiliated Pacific Islands. Although the focus of PIERC is on natural resources under stewardship of the Federal government and its local partners (including National Parks, United States Fish and Wildlife Services (USFWS) Refuges, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) sanctuaries and reserves, State reserves and protected areas), research and management activities may be conducted in any Pacific basin location that provides information essential to management and conservation of CLM ecosystems. Moreover, science may address issues that span the waterline, that is, research may be required in both terrestrial and aquatic habitats in order to fully describe, understand, and predict the impact of resource management and usage on various components of the marine and coastal ecosystems.
Pages/Duration: 394
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10790/2678
Appears in Collections:Hawaii Cooperative Studies Unit (HCSU)



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