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THE URBANIZATION OF THE HAWAIIAN STILT (HIMANTOPUS MEXICANUS KNUDSENI): MEETING THE NEW NEIGHBORS

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Title:THE URBANIZATION OF THE HAWAIIAN STILT (HIMANTOPUS MEXICANUS KNUDSENI): MEETING THE NEW NEIGHBORS
Authors:Kawasaki, Martha T.
Contributors:Hart, Patrick J. (advisor)
Tropical Conservation Biology & Environmental Science (department)
Keywords:Conservation biology
Wildlife conservation
GPS satellite tracking
Habitat occurance
Hawaiian stilt
show 3 moreOahu
Urban habitat
wetlands
show less
Date Issued:Aug 2020
Publisher:University of Hawaii at Hilo
Abstract:The Hawaiian stilt, or Ae’o, is an endangered waterbird endemic to the Hawaiian Islands. Loss of suitable wetland habitats due to anthropogenic development is a leading cause for decline, as well as the introduction of non-native predators and invasive wetland plants. While other Hawaiian waterbirds are largely restricted to wetlands, Hawaiian stilts appear to be adapting to the urban environment, using heavily modified upland habitats. In my thesis study, I fitted four Hawaiian stilts with GPS satellite tags to document their use of developed areas, undeveloped fields, sports fields and wetland habitats over a 6-month period. I found a high use of non-wetland habitat, with significant differences in habitat occupancy among the individual stilts and across different times of day. Wetlands were the dominant habitat occupied from morning to early afternoon, but non-wetland habitats were occupied in higher frequency in the evening and early morning hours. The use of habitats outside wetlands implies management strategies may need to be updated to encompass these additional habitats.
Pages/Duration:25 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10790/5378
Rights:All UHH dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: Tropical Conservation Biology and Environmental Science
TCBES Theses


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