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Interpreting ancient food practices: stable isotope and molecular analyses of visible and absorbed residues from a year-long cooking experiment

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dc.contributor.author Miller, Melanie J.
dc.contributor.author Whelton, Helen L.
dc.contributor.author Swift, Jillian A.
dc.contributor.author Maline, Sophia
dc.contributor.author Hammann, Simon
dc.contributor.author Cramp, Lucy J. E.
dc.contributor.author McCleary, Alexandra
dc.contributor.author Taylor, Geoffrey
dc.contributor.author Vacca, Kirsten
dc.contributor.author Becks, Fanya
dc.contributor.author Evershed, Richard P.
dc.contributor.author Hastorf, Christine A.
dc.date.accessioned 2020-10-06T00:08:27Z
dc.date.available 2020-10-06T00:08:27Z
dc.date.issued 2020-08-27
dc.identifier.citation Miller, M.J., Whelton, H.L., Swift, J.A. et al. Interpreting ancient food practices: stable isotope and molecular analyses of visible and absorbed residues from a year-long cooking experiment. Sci Rep 10, 13704 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-70109-8
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10790/5506
dc.description Modified from original published version to conform to ADA standards.
dc.description.abstract Chemical analyses of carbonized and absorbed organic residues from archaeological ceramic cooking vessels can provide a unique window into the culinary cultures of ancient people, resource use, and environmental effects by identifying ingredients used in ancient meals. However, it remains uncertain whether recovered organic residues represent only the final foodstuffs prepared or are the accumulation of various cooking events within the same vessel. To assess this, we cooked seven mixtures of C3 and C4 foodstuffs in unglazed pots once per week for one year, then changed recipes between pots for the final cooking events. We conducted bulk stable-isotope analysis and lipid residue analysis on the charred food macro-remains, carbonized thin layer organic patina residues and absorbed lipids over the course of the experiment. Our results indicate that: (1) the composition of charred macro-remains represent the final foodstuffs cooked within vessels, (2) thin-layer patina residues represent a mixture of previous cooking events with bias towards the final product(s) cooked in the pot, and (3) absorbed lipid residues are developed over a number of cooking events and are replaced slowly over time, with little evidence of the final recipe ingredients.
dc.format.extent 17 pages
dc.language.iso en-US
dc.publisher Springer Nature
dc.relation.uri https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-70109-8
dc.rights Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/
dc.subject Lipids
dc.subject Food
dc.subject Cooking
dc.subject Environmental Effects
dc.title Interpreting ancient food practices: stable isotope and molecular analyses of visible and absorbed residues from a year-long cooking experiment
dc.type Article
dc.type.dcmi Text
dc.identifier.doi 10.1038/s41598-020-70109-8
prism.publicationname Nature - Scientific Reports
prism.volume 10
Appears in Collections: Vacca, Kirsten


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