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The Psychology of Extremism

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dc.contributor.author Aumer, Katherine V.
dc.contributor.author Tenold, Vegas
dc.contributor.author Erickson, Michael A.
dc.date.accessioned 2021-06-16T00:46:53Z
dc.date.available 2021-06-16T00:46:53Z
dc.date.issued 2020
dc.identifier.citation Aumer, K. V. (Ed.). (2020). <em>The Psychology of Extremism</em>. Springer Nature. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-59698-9
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10790/6167
dc.description This record contains selections of the book <em>The Psychology of Extremism</em>, written in part and edited by Dr. Katherine V. Aumer. The main sections include:<br><ul><li>Forward by Vegas Tenold</li><li>Introduction by Katherine V. Aumer</li><li>The Use of Love and Hate in Extremist Groups by Katherine V. Aumer and Michael A. Erickson</li></ul>
dc.description.abstract This volume examines the psychological factors, environments, and social factors contributing to identification with extremist identities and ideologies. Incorporating recent findings on interpersonal relationships, emotions, and social identity, the book aims to improve understanding of what makes individuals vulnerable to extremism. It concludes with a discussion of the intricacies of identification with extremist groups, a proposal for de-radicalization, and a call for awareness as a means to resist polarization. Chapters highlight interdisciplinary research into specific concepts and behaviors that can lead to extremism, addressing topics such as: <ul> <li>Homogamy, tribalism and the desire to belong</li> <li>Shared hatred in strong group identities</li> <li>The impact of emotional contagion on personal relationships</li> <li>Dehumanization across political party lines</li> </ul> An in-depth exploration of an increasingly divisive modern issue, The Psychology of Extremism is an essential resource for researchers and students across social psychology, sociology, political psychology, and political science.
dc.format.extent 43 pages
dc.language.iso en-US
dc.publisher Springer Nature
dc.relation.uri https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-59698-9
dc.rights These sections and book chapters are made available in accordance with the publisher's policy and may be subject to US copyright law. Please refer to the publisher's site for terms of use.
dc.rights Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/
dc.subject Personality and Social Psychology
dc.subject.lcsh Radicalism--Psychological aspects
dc.subject.lcsh United States--Politics and government
dc.subject.lcsh Communication in politics
dc.subject.lcsh Communication--Political aspects--United States
dc.title The Psychology of Extremism
dc.type Book Chapter
dc.type.dcmi Text
dc.identifier.doi 10.1007/978-3-030-59698-9
Appears in Collections: Aumer, Katherine V.


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