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Sustainable Management of Alaska’s Kenai River Chinook Salmon in its Economic, Cultural, and Scientific Contexts

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Item Summary

Title:Sustainable Management of Alaska’s Kenai River Chinook Salmon in its Economic, Cultural, and Scientific Contexts
Authors:Malone, Wilson L.
Contributors:Canale, Lisa K. (advisor)
Begich, Robert (mentor)
Keywords:Chinook salmon
Alaska
Fishery management
population management
conservation
show 1 moreOncorhynchus tshawytscha
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Date Issued:Dec 2020
Abstract:This internship focuses on Alaska’s Kenai River salmon populations. The role consists of working as a Fish and Wildlife Technician II for the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. Responsibilities included operating a research boat on the river as part of the in-river test netting project, working on a creel survey crew, and other research projects as needed. This project provides data on the adult returns of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), such as catch rates, age, and genetic composition used to manage the fishery. Age-structured data is used in models to predict future returns of Chinook salmon, which provides valuable insight into the population’s health and long-term trends. Genetic comparison enables sub-population management of the Chinook salmon. Creel surveys are designed to monitor sport fishing harvest rates and connect the fishery’s social and scientific aspects. The Chinook salmon population is maintained under the principle of sustained yield. Recent declines in this population’s numbers and size have caused problems for the management of the population. Political strife caused by allocation decisions complicates management decisions. The salmon populations in this region are significant economically and socially and form a large portion of local culture and identity. Efforts to maintain economically important salmon species are essential for the region’s economy and social fabric. This position contributes directly to that goal. Through this position, partial requirements of the Master’s of Science in Tropical Conservation Biology and Environmental Science internship track have been fulfilled.
Description:A report submitted to the graduate division of the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Tropical Conservation Biology and Environmental Science Professional Internship Track.
Pages/Duration:36 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10790/6918
Appears in Collections: TCBES Professional Internship Reports


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