Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10790/3416

MOʻOLELO ʻO NĀ IWI KŪPUNA: CONNECTING THE PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE OF THE NĀ ʻŌIWI MAMO

File Size Format  
Halliwell_hilo.hawaii_1418O_10150.pdf 1.13 MB Adobe PDF View/Open

Item Summary

dc.contributor.advisor Morrison, Lynn
dc.contributor.author Halliwell, Tamara Ku'ulei
dc.date.accessioned 2018-02-23T19:58:44Z
dc.date.available 2018-02-23T19:58:44Z
dc.date.issued 2017-12
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10790/3416
dc.description.abstract Nā ʻŌiwi mamo (Aboriginal Hawaiian descendants) have a deep and abiding love and respect for their iwi kūpuna (ancestral remains). In this thesis, I explore the attitudes and perceptions of the nā ʻŌiwi mamo of Hawaiʻi Island and more specifically Hōkūliʻa development community located in Kailua-Kona. I interviewed 20 nā ʻŌiwi mamo who are connected to the burial issues concerning iwi kūpuna. They represent lineal descendants, cultural descendants, and ʻŌiwi archaeologists. Through the coding, five major themes were identified: identity through place and ancestors; kuleana (responsibility) and kāhea (calling); preservation in place; knowledge for advocacy; and self-determination and decision making. An innovative educational module provided the stimulus for kūkākūkā (discussion) on how non-destructive skeletal examinations can produce osteobiographies, or another story, of the lives of the iwi kūpuna. This module was instrumental in understanding the changing lens of nā ʻŌiwi mamo empowerment in protecting and preserving the iwi kūpuna. In this thesis, I demonstrate that the iwi kūpuna have a significant role in edifying ʻŌiwi (Aboriginal Hawaiian) ancestry as well as the ʻŌiwi current cultural identity. I demonstrate this by highlighting the central significance of moʻolelo (stories) in the ʻŌiwi culture, and specifically how osteobiographies are a contemporary form of moʻolelo. Ka poʻe kahiko (the people of old) of Hawaiʻi were haʻi moʻolelo (storytellers). Oli (chant), hula (dance), and moʻokūʻauhau (genealogy) are traditional methods of storytelling. In this way moʻolelo transcend time and space, linking each succeeding generation to the ones before as well as those yet unborn, an unbroken chain of continuity of the ʻŌiwi culture. Osteobiographies can be added to the canon of knowledge passed from generation to generation. The most significant finding is that nā ʻŌiwi mamo in this research project were not opposed to learning the stories of their iwi kūpuna under certain conditions and have it become a part of the historical and cultural canon of nā ʻŌiwi mamo.
dc.format.extent 144 pages
dc.language.iso en
dc.subject Archaeology
dc.subject Bones
dc.subject Burials
dc.subject iwi kupuna
dc.title MOʻOLELO ʻO NĀ IWI KŪPUNA: CONNECTING THE PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE OF THE NĀ ʻŌIWI MAMO
dc.description.degree M.A.
dc.description.institution University of Hawaii at Hilo
dc.contributor.department Heritage Management
dcterms.rights All UHH dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
local.identifier.alturi http://dissertations.umi.com/hilo.hawaii:10150
Appears in Collections: Heritage Management


Please email libraryada-l@lists.hawaii.edu if you need this content in ADA-compliant format.

Items in UH System Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.