Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10790/5734

SMARTPHONE APPLICATION USE PROMPTS AN EVIDENCE-BASED INTERVENTION TO IMPROVE MEDICATION ADHERENCE IN THE FAMILY PRACTICE OUTPATIENT SETTING

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Title:SMARTPHONE APPLICATION USE PROMPTS AN EVIDENCE-BASED INTERVENTION TO IMPROVE MEDICATION ADHERENCE IN THE FAMILY PRACTICE OUTPATIENT SETTING
Authors:Anahu, Jessica
Contributors:Norris-Taylor, Joyce (instructor)
Keywords:Drug utilization
medication adherence
Smartphones
phone app
family practice
show 6 moreDrugs
nonadherence
medication self-management
app
Medisafe
Medical care
show less
Date Issued:18 May 2021
Abstract:Background: Medication adherence is defined as whether a person takes their prescribed medication at the frequency it is prescribed as well as whether it is continuously taken for as long as prescribed. Medication nonadherence is a complex and multidimensional public health challenge due to the increasing number of chronically ill individuals. Research has shown that average nonadherence rates for persons taking long-term medications for chronic conditions are between 25%-50%. Avoidable healthcare costs attributed to nonadherence account for $100 to $300 billion annually. Medication adherence can be improved at many different levels and points of contact in the healthcare system utilizing multidisciplinary and technology-based approaches. There is researched evidence that supports the use of smartphone applications (apps) to improve self-management and medication adherence rates in the United States. However, the use of such has not been studied in the State of Hawai’i.

Methods: A mixed methodology pilot study was conducted to evaluate the use of the Medisafe® Medication Management smartphone app on improving medication adherence rates of individuals from an outpatient Family Practice setting. The Medisafe® app was chosen for its comprehensive design that is intended for persons who are on multiple medications for chronic diseases who have a hard time complying with their medication regimen. Participants utilized the app as their primary reminder system for three consecutive weeks. Data before and following app use were collected via survey and statistically analyzed to determine if a medication reminder app is useful for persons in Hawai’i to improve medication adherence rates.

Results: Ten participants completed the 3-week intervention and completed the post-survey. Descriptive statistics evaluated pre- and post-survey results, which showed that medication adherence rates improved from 40% pre-intervention to 70% post-intervention and that the average number of days medications were missed was reduced with daily use of the Medisafe® app. Evaluation of participant experience indicated overall positive feedback: the app was easy to use, the app was useful, they were 100% “very likely” to continue use after the pilot study, and were “very likely” to recommend its use to others (90%). Feedback from the family medicine clinic providers and staff specified that participants seemed more likely to show interest in participation when the Primary Care Provider (PCP) themselves directly recommended or “prescribed” the app use as part of their treatment plan.

Conclusion: Data from this study are reflective of other previously conducted studies in that the use of smartphone medication reminder apps improves medication adherence rates. Individuals who utilize self-management tools to engage in health-promoting behaviors retain autonomy in realizing the outcome of their own goals towards their “ideal health.” Clinicians are encouraged to recommend and support the use of smartphone medication reminder apps to patients to support the long-term goal of improving medication adherence rates population-wide and decreasing the incidence of adverse events related to nonadherence, including avoidable hospital admissions to ultimately lower total healthcare costs.
Pages/Duration:51
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10790/5734
Appears in Collections: DNP Practice Inquiry Projects


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